audreylove15

seaworldtruth:

Bridgette Pirtle. What an interesting roller coaster she has been on the passed year. First, anti captivity, bragging about Blackfish and her claim to fame along with it. Now, pro captivity asking for her job back at SeaWorld claiming Blackfish is propaganda.

What I find most interesting is she had seen Blackfish at the premiere, way before any of us saw it. Way before it was made famous. She knew what was in it, she knew the message it sent and she knew what information it gave off. After the public outcry against SeaWorld and the trainers in the movie became a little famous and she did not, she became a little crazed. She needed a way to get her name in the spotlight again. She chose to be one of the first trainers to go against Blackfish that snowballed into other trainers doing the same.(and sounding absolutely ridiculous, I might add)

What is her stance on captivity? She believes that her relationship with the orcas is most important piece to this pro-anti captivity puzzle. Yes the trainers and orcas have a supposed intense relationship. Whether this is true or not, what importance does it serve? It doesn’t, she just needed something to get her back into the spotlight.

It’s obvious everything she says is biased and set to her agenda. She is pro captivity when it suits her and anti captivity with it suits her. That is why nothing she says can be trusted or taken seriously.

From josiephone on tumblr: Apparently some vegans are telling people not to eat honey to support bees.

STOP. STOP NOW.
DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?

Buy honey (local if possible) -> support beekeepers -> support bees.

I swear people don’t even think this stuff out. 
Beekeepers provide bees with an environment in which they can live, and are encouraged to thrive. Bees then have a big huge giant person who can deal with any threats to the hive. 
Yes, honey is a winter food supply for bees, but beekeepers (unless they’re dicks, in which case they’d be shooting themselves in the foot) will NEVER take too much honey from a hive, and will always ensure that bees have enough food. Think about it, you’re not going to starve a source of income/hobby, are you?

So now.
Support beekeepers.
Support bees.

buzz.

From josiephone on tumblr: Apparently some vegans are telling people not to eat honey to support bees.

STOP. STOP NOW.
DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?

Buy honey (local if possible) -> support beekeepers -> support bees.

I swear people don’t even think this stuff out. 
Beekeepers provide bees with an environment in which they can live, and are encouraged to thrive. Bees then have a big huge giant person who can deal with any threats to the hive. 
Yes, honey is a winter food supply for bees, but beekeepers (unless they’re dicks, in which case they’d be shooting themselves in the foot) will NEVER take too much honey from a hive, and will always ensure that bees have enough food. Think about it, you’re not going to starve a source of income/hobby, are you?

So now.
Support beekeepers.
Support bees.

buzz.

marylily2

Anonymous asked:

I'm vegan as well but I consume honey. What is wrong with honey?

adviceforvegans answered:

The truth is, the honey industry is dark and horrifying. 

First of all, it’s important that you understand a little about bees themselves. Like all earthlings, bees are sentient and have a central nervous system. This means that they are able to think, to feel, to experience joy, sadness, pain, fear and excitement. In reality, they are no different to cats, dogs, cows, whales or humans.

Secondly, it is important to realise who is keeping these bees. You may have an image in your mind of a man with a few hives out in his backyard. While that is in fact the proper image of most beekeepers, most honey comes from full-time factory bee farmers. 

A successor queen is selected by a human instead of the reigning queen, both of whom may have been artificially inseminated. Queens can live for as long as five years but most commercial beekeepers replace them every two years. In other words, the old queen is killed. Backyard beekeepers also regularly kill their queens. This is done for numerous reasons that all boil down to exerting control over the hive. For example, it is done to prevent swarming, aggression, mite infestation, and to keep honey production at a maximum. Queens come from commercial queen suppliers. 

Travel can be rough on the queens. Once at the post office or shipping depot, nearly anything can happen. Queens can be over heated, chilled, left out in the sun for hours, banged around in baggage compartments, and exposed to insecticides. Often, the post office or shipping hub fails to contact the customer when the queens arrive and they may sit in storage for days. It is surprising that the queens come through as well as they do. 

Finally, hives are routinely split in half according to what the keeper wants, not the queen.

When manipulating the bees, most beekeepers use a smoker to maintain control and to prevent some stings. The smoke gets the bees to gorge themselves on honey, which calms them down. The smoke also masks the alarm pheromone that the guard bees release and prevents the entire colony from becoming agitated. 

During the fall and winter a mouse guard is often placed over the entrance to the hive. Usually, the bees drag their dead out of the hive but the mouse guard often prevents this from happening. 

Generally speaking, there is a lack of regard for the bees’ lives. In the US, 10-20% of colonies are lost over the winter. It is partly by accident and partly on purpose. Some beekeepers kill off their hives before winter because this practice can make economic sense. 

Unfortunately, it is not the small backyard beekeeper but rather the large, factory bee farmer, so a lot of bees are killed even if most beekeepers don’t use the practice. 

Not to mention, in the process of checking up on the hive and taking the honey, some bees get squashed by the frames or stepped on. Bees who sting the keeper in defence of their home obviously die too. And if two colonies are combined, the queen of the weaker colony is killed. 

So that the honey can be easily removed from the comb, it is often warmed prior to removal. Bees brought into the warming room will fly to a window where they can be trapped to the outside by a wire cone or bee escape. If there are no windows in the room, other methods such as an electric grid can be used to dispose of the stray bees.

Bees are animals with a large nervous system capable of transmitting pain signals. And unlike in the case of plants, pain as we know it is very clearly demonstrated in bees as they are capable of moving to avoid it. 

So why don’t vegans consume honey from backyard bee keepers? 

1. Backyard bee keepers often obtain their queens from factory farms.

2. It is still an animal product so by definition, it’s not vegan.

3. Even if these bees have the best possible lives, it’s still a form of exploitation in that they are being used for human gain and benefit as opposed to existing for their own purpose.

4. It’s vomit. Literally.

5. Most importantly, it’s not ours to take. It does not belong to us and in a sense, it’s a form of theft.

This is why I don’t consume honey!

NO NO THIS IS SO HORRIBLY WRONG!! We need to support local bee keepers. Bee populations have dropped incredibly. This is a bigger picture situation that is really important. I hate when people spread this about bees. We need to keep LOCAL bee keepers in business.

Two big joys in the activism world include the celebration of victories and passionate conservations with others who are fighting for the same cause. Yet, neither of these two components are possible without raising awareness and educating others about issues.

This is why the Oceanic Preservation Society (OPS) has again teamed up with race car driver Leilani Münter to place marine animal protection in front of the eyes of millions of race car fans and TV viewers.

“If we only speak to people who already believe in the same things we do, who is going to change the minds of those who don’t?” Leilani often says, as reported by OPS.

Münter, a biology graduate turned race car driver and environmental activist, worked with OPS back in 2010 after the release of its documentary, “The Cove,” to race a Cove-themed car at Daytona, bringing attention to the plight of Taiji’s dolphins to a whole new audience.

This year, Münter plans to race a “Blackfish” car to highlight the issues surrounding orca captivity and encourage the public to open their eyes and watch the 2013 documentary.

OPS is currently running a campaign to raise $115,000 for Leilani so that she can enter a race at Talladega Super speedway on May 3, 2014 and have the opportunity to compete with the “Blackfish” car.

The May 3rd race will be televised live on Fox Sports 1, which has a reach of 90 million North American homes, marking serious potential for raising awareness about orcas and for sparking interest in their cause.

“We want to make sure Leilani has every opportunity to make history by becoming the first woman to win an ARCA race, and we want her to do it in a ‘Blackfish’ race car. Imagine how much awareness that would bring to mainstream America about the fight to end cetacean captivity,” writes OPS.

If enough funds are not raised in time for Talladega, OPS and Leilani aim to run the “Blackfish” car at another televised race once full funding is secured, although Talladega is the preferred race since the viewing audience is so large.

To help with this campaign and, as OPS says,“bring the issue of orca captivity to millions,” consider making a donation right here and note that the gift is “For Talladega.”

Two big joys in the activism world include the celebration of victories and passionate conservations with others who are fighting for the same cause. Yet, neither of these two components are possible without raising awareness and educating others about issues.

This is why the Oceanic Preservation Society (OPS) has again teamed up with race car driver Leilani Münter to place marine animal protection in front of the eyes of millions of race car fans and TV viewers.

“If we only speak to people who already believe in the same things we do, who is going to change the minds of those who don’t?” Leilani often says, as reported by OPS.

Münter, a biology graduate turned race car driver and environmental activist, worked with OPS back in 2010 after the release of its documentary, “The Cove,” to race a Cove-themed car at Daytona, bringing attention to the plight of Taiji’s dolphins to a whole new audience.

This year, Münter plans to race a “Blackfish” car to highlight the issues surrounding orca captivity and encourage the public to open their eyes and watch the 2013 documentary.

OPS is currently running a campaign to raise $115,000 for Leilani so that she can enter a race at Talladega Super speedway on May 3, 2014 and have the opportunity to compete with the “Blackfish” car.

The May 3rd race will be televised live on Fox Sports 1, which has a reach of 90 million North American homes, marking serious potential for raising awareness about orcas and for sparking interest in their cause.

“We want to make sure Leilani has every opportunity to make history by becoming the first woman to win an ARCA race, and we want her to do it in a ‘Blackfish’ race car. Imagine how much awareness that would bring to mainstream America about the fight to end cetacean captivity,” writes OPS.

If enough funds are not raised in time for Talladega, OPS and Leilani aim to run the “Blackfish” car at another televised race once full funding is secured, although Talladega is the preferred race since the viewing audience is so large.

To help with this campaign and, as OPS says,“bring the issue of orca captivity to millions,” consider making a donation right here and note that the gift is “For Talladega.”

Meet Mila, she is a 41-year-old elephant, who resides in “San Diego Zoo.” Mila haven’t been around her kind for 37 years. This is the moment, capturing the elephant meeting another member of her species for the first time after all these years. You are not going to believe the way they greet each other. So much love!!! This became a remarkable historical moment for the zoo. The zookeepers were very surprised to see how fast Mila accepted another elephant, and how well she handled the meeting. This is so touching! How would you act, if you were parted with other human beings for so long, and finally got to meet one? Enjoy this heartwarming beautiful moment, and don’t forget to share it.

Read more at http://mostamazingplanet.com/mila-waited-37-years-meet-see-happen-next/#mYwOgI8T4ee9Hg3k.99

fightingforwhales

CNN did not buy Blackfish out of concern for SeaWorld’s orcas. If that had been the case, they would have rushed the film into broadcast after purchasing the rights in January, not waiting for Fall. If that had been the case, they wouldn’t have published an online piece in July, six months after purchasing the rights to the film, encouraging readers to take the VIP tour at SeaWorld Orlando, complete with photo of jumping Shamu.

Blackfish was purchased because of the success of shows such as Whale Wars and Swamp People on other networks. It’s part of a new strategy under former NBCUniversal CEO Jeff Zucker, who took the reigns as President of CNN Worldwide on January 1, to build ratings resulting in stronger ad revenue.

ThemedReality

#AskMeWhyISupportSeaWorld

(via askmewhyisupportseaworld)

I fail to see how this negates the message of Blackfish. The film’s points would still stand no matter which broadcasting company had purchased it. 

(via fightingforwhales)
loveforcetaceans

loveforcetaceans:

betheirvoiceseathechange:

freedomfororcas:

Peter Alexander swims with Corky, despite never having worked with an orca in his life.

SeaWorld is super strict about working restrictions with orcas, except of course if you’re a news outlet willing to pay a lump sum to get a segment with them!

YEP IM GONNA PICK THIS APART I HOPE YOURE READY TUMBLR:

1. I love how they don’t even explain what happened the LAST TIME (first time??) they put an amatuer in the water with a whale. The secretary that almost got killed??? Hellooooo?!
2. Where is the education, conservation, and research?!!! Nope nope nope, they didn’t even talk about any of that! And I didn’t learn jack shit about the whales other than names of tricks they do.
3. He says it’s the most peaceful feeling he’s ever had, it was the best feeling he’s ever had, he loved it, he had so much fun- BUT DO YOU KNOW HOW CORKY FEELS nope you don’t.

Buhhhh sometimes. How old is this video?

^^^

askmewhyisupportseaworld:

I’m glad this person is doing well.

Now please tell me. Orcas don’t do harm in the wild. Oh and for the more out spoken, they can never do harm in the wild?

This whale can do this and everyone wants to defend it, but if a captive orca does it everyone makes a big deal.

Their orcas and it happens, now drop the argument “aggression happens because of captivity”. There are way more incidents that happened in captivity that are less fatal then ones that are like this one. There are only a selected few that can compare to this one.

Please, these things happen in the wild and in captive settings. Just more in captivity because we interact in the water with them too. Don’t mislead the public.

Now what if this was Visser??? What happened to the whales know her? It doesn’t matter, these accidents happen all the time.

#AskMeWhyISupportSeaWorld

Once again, your point is moot because it wasn’t an attack.

But let’s point out how you know absolutely nothing about animal behavior for you do say deprivation, lack of mental and physical stimulation etc(all according to the orcas, NOT US) doesn’t cause aggression or mental illness.

It does so in every other animal, why would it not orcas??